Saturday, May 27, 2017

Why teaching feels like Instagram yoga sometimes


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Scrolling through my Instagram feed and watching all of my fav yoga idols effortlessly pull off insane standing poses, midair splits and perfect crows, my (not as flat or tight) stomach twisted. I'll be practicing yoga well into my 50s before I ever get into an aero-twist. 

But teaching isn't really all that different from Instagram yoga nowadays. 

Everywhere I go and everyone I meet has a new kickass method/approach/idea/activity/prop that they use in class that makes my classes feel like a yoga newbie trying up-dog for the first time all over again. We, teachers, talk about what we do and how we do it with ease because, hey, teaching is a personal thing.

So what happens when we make it look darn easy? Easy as standing on your arms and doing a split looks on Instagram or going into a class and rocking it Dogme style, with class selfies to show.
But when you (and me) try it you fall flat on your face 4 times, your face turns purple midway, and probably by the end of it you'd have pulled a muscle. And I'm not talking about yoga.
This is where the fun part comes in. While for yoga we accept that it's going to take practice, consistency and a whole lot of ouch, when it comes to teaching, I feel we tend to give up way too soon. We want to rock it on our first go and most often than not, we can't. For a whole lot of reasons that probably have nothing to do with our teaching capacity as of today, but rather with our teaching flexibility that needs to be gently stretched and transformed into something awesome tomorrow. 

But what do we do with peer-pressure? Watching pics on Instagram with star yogis effortlessly posing in painfully difficult poses is both inspiring and deeply intimidating. We know all about peer-pressure as teachers and we use it day in day out to talk about our students. 
I say we stop for a second and use that word to talk about ourselves. I've been in situations where peer-pressure has made me do things that felt deeply unnatural to me. It was as if I was trying Tuladandasana (standing stick pose - great for balance) wearing high-heels and a cocktail dress. It just won't work. What I need to do was either change into something more comfortable    (i.e. take the time to find out about it, try it out, adjust myself to it, put on a little knowledge, get to where I want one step at a time) or find a pose that suited the way I was dressed (i.e. see what I can do here and now, choose the best that I can for myself and my students, work on bettering myself starting from where I am, invent something new to fit me and possibly others like me). A pose like Utkatasana (awkward pose) would do the trick in high heels and a cocktail dress if you were wondering. 

It would do the trick with teaching as well. We should start being a bit more awkward, less intimidated. And we might just find a way to post a great Instagram standing yoga pic after all.



The Sound Eater

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