Friday, November 25, 2016

My Paris Presentation On Pron

6:12 AM
Hey guys, just here to post my slides from the TESOL France 2016 Colloquium. It was an amazing experience and I am grateful to TESOL France for providing me with such an opportunity and doing an awesome job at organizing the conference. I got to meet a lot of very interesting people, saw some really interesting presentations and performed my first ever speaker job! Yay!

So here are the slides. If you have any Qs, please feel free to leave a comment and I'll get back to you asap.



The Sound Eater

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Guess it sounds like Sounds Bingo (free worksheet)

1:11 AM
I've always been fascinated by sound. It somehow always holds the key to better communication, higher intelligibility and overall a feeling of accomplishment. I wonder at every little step my students make towards acquiring sounds that their L1 either doesn't possess or they, the sounds, sound totally or partially different. I've made it my business to help my students, young or not so young, get into the good habit of practicing some pron every lesson. It might sound silly or it might sound pretentious, but I truly believe that "scientia potentia est" as my beloved Latin professor used to say. An informed mind is powerful.
I put together a little game for pronunciation that has been giving me many satisfactions. It works on the principles of a classic game of Bingo. But it makes it a bit more tricky.
This is the grid.



As you can see. The sounds I was focusing on were the Past Simple "-ed" endings, this due to an issue most languages have with consonant clustering which is quite common in the English language.
I asked students to fill in their grid with whatever sound they wanted (from the three available).
So their grid should look like something like this:


Now the fun begins. I, the teacher, will have a bagful of regular Past Simple conjugated verbs. I will extract one at a time and read it out. If the verbs ends in their first box's sound, they can cross it off and write the verb under the box. If not, they must wait for their sound. So technically, the Bingo game goes from left to right, one sound at a time. They can't cross off their last right sound if the first four haven't been crossed out.
The concept is pretty simple, but you might want to do a couple of trials with your students to make sure they understand the logic of it.

The game can be adapted to any which sound you like. You can use it to teach diphthongs, or maybe the difference between stressed vowel sounds and the schwa. I've used it for many sounds and it works just as well.

Click here for your EMPTY BINGO WORKSHEET

Download away, have fun, teach and if you can, let me know how it worked and if you and your students enjoyed it!

The Sound Eater